ebook or PDF Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor Author John C. Bogle



10 thoughts on “Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor

  1. says:

    If you're not a super informed investor this is a really valuable book to readMain take aways from this bookAll market index funds bond and stock are an ideal place for most people to invest money because Their expense ratios are low and effi

  2. says:

    For Bogle converts you won't find much new in this book For everyone else and that's most of you you really ought to read

  3. says:

    This is the newest edition of one of the best investing books I've read I was curious to hear Bogle's thoughts on the recent economic situation and his reflections on his sage advice ten years earlier The last ten years although to

  4. says:

    Easy there John Bogle save a few pats on your back for meI really enjoyed this but its not for everyone It does have a lot of dense information proving its point The point Investing in low cost all market passively managed index funds for the long term is what you should doIf you need some one to prove it to you then read this book By abou

  5. says:

    I recently finished reading Common Sense on Mutual Funds New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor by John C BogleBelow are key excerpts from this book that I found to be insightful Investing is an act of fait

  6. says:

    This is not the book to read if you're looking for a primer on investing or retirement planning that includes Bogle's philosphy Instead this i

  7. says:

    Not a beginners guide to investing You have to be really geeky to read cover to cover There are other short comparatively bo

  8. says:

    This lengthy book was simple to understand but also profound and complex in its message Each section focuses on a different but crucial financial obstacle in the current mutual fund industryIt is a little difficult to go through this book due to its length but its well worth it to read through the content The main message shines th

  9. says:

    A very thorough blueprint for the individual investor Bogle believes in investor discipline long term focus diligent saving and the use of passively managed index funds By clearly laying out the four dimensions o

  10. says:

    “Common Sense on Mutual Funds” by John Bogle is a substantial book It is uite long Reading the newest version the 10th anniversary edition adds plentiful commentary making this even longer Bogle likes to offer as complete an argument as he can for low cost index funds and I personally found it uite a bit beyond what I was expecting I enjoyed the voice of the author He presented his information in a casual manner although with

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read Í eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ë John C. Bogle

ThemWritten in a straightforward and accessible style this reliable resource examines the fundamentals of mutual fund investing in today's turbulent market environment and offers timeless advice in building an investment portfolio Along the way Bogle shows you how simplicity and common sense invariably trump costly complexity and how a low cost broadly diversified portfolio is virtually assured of outperforming the vast majority of Wall Street professionals ov. This is not the book to read if you re looking for a primer on investing or retirement planning that includes Bogle s philosphy Instead this is the book to read once you re underway and have some knowledge of what you re doing from his other entry level books or after you ve started with the Boglehead s seriesHe goes into depth in an easy to read style about the mutual fund industry and why his philosophy on investing hold index funds don t time the market passive investing etc is both sound and proven given these factsA excellent read probably none better should you want depth on the why and the numbers to back it up Just don t expect much advise or hand holding on the how This may not need to be added as a reference book to have in your library as you navigate your own investments from time to time but can make a good and enlightening one time read if only to shore up support for Bogle s investing philosphy borrowed from the libraryLast the 10th Ed adds his updated reflections at the end of each section looking back 10 years from when the book first came in print

read Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor

Common Sense on Mutual Funds: New Imperatives for the Intelligent Investor

Er the long termWritten by respected mutual fund industry legend John C BogleDiscusses the timeless fundamentals of investing that apply in any type of marketReflects on the structural and regulatory changes in the mutual fund industryOther titles by Bogle The Little Book of Common Sense Investing and EnoughSecuring your financial future has never seemed difficult but you'll be a better investor for having read the Second Edition of Common Sense on Mutual Fund. Not a beginners guide to investing You have to be really geeky to read cover to cover There are other short comparatively books on investing that follow Bogle s investing theology A part geek can pick and choose what to read and come out with a lot of great advice Even if you know the basics invest for the long haul in super low cost funds indexed to major market indexes there are certainly some here that is practical I found his arguments concerning owning foreign stock interesting A few tidbits you can feel comfortable not owning foreign for a number of reasons including currency risk Also he made an interesting argument that much of the business done by companies in the SP 500 for example is foreign Anyways glad I read it but certainly not light reading

read Í eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB Ë John C. Bogle

John C Bogle shares his extensive insights on investing in mutual fundsSince the first edition of Common Sense on Mutual Funds was published in 1999 much has changed and no one is aware of this than mutual fund pioneer John Bogle Now in this completely updated Second Edition Bogle returns to take another critical look at the mutual fund industry and help investors navigate their way through the staggering array of investment alternatives that are available to. This is the newest edition of one of the best investing books I ve read I was curious to hear Bogle s thoughts on the recent economic situation and his reflections on his sage advice ten years earlier The last ten years although totally unprecedented and unpredictable have certainly borne him outThis book doesn t actually talk much about the stock market or asset allocation It talks specifically about the mutual fund industry This book doesn t give the standard lines about beating the market and picking mutual funds It s even uniue among books about passive investing in that it doesn t talk much about asset allocation and Modern Portfolio TheoryWhat it does is incessantly rip into traditional mutual funds particularly their cost structure The first part explains all the ways costs matter I found my jaw dropping a few times during this part I already agreed with him and yet I was astonished I knew that costs matter but I had no idea that they mattered to that extent I used to believe high costs are justified in some cases but after this book I really understand that even small differences in cost make an enormous difference long term Later the book discusses how mutual funds are organized and how they subtly deceive shareholders It seems downright fraudulent and Bogle agrees All along he never fails to offer an alternative index fundsI was grateful that the book ended with a mini autobiography and an explanation of how Vanguard works which is the company he founded This man is a crusader a hero practically a saint among the investing community He had the guts to stand up against an enormous industry that was complicit in ripping off their shareholders Bogle was a promising mutual fund executive at a very young age and he could have increased his fortunes by several orders of magnitude Even though he certainly did very well for himself he was clearly interested in sticking up for the investors than in taking their money His company Vanguard is very uniue They re owned by their fund shareholders have practically no marketing budget operate at cost and will turn away money if taking it would not be in the best interests of their shareholders